Saturday, 26 June 2010

Shelters

I have just competed an article on Shelters. I have been looking at my own tent - the Fly Creek - and thinking about trying tarp camping as well. As I was researching all of this, I wished someone had got all the really useful analysis into one place and that's what I've tried to do. Also, there's a plethora of extremely useful discussion on your blogs and I've linked some of the ones that spring immediately to mind.

I have made the article a permanent "page" so anyone can stumble across it, but some commentary from you all would be welcome. You all have experiences of various types of shelter and I may have made some controversial points - please feel free to correct my analysis or make contrary arguments. I don't think I have actually come to any conclusions - that was not my intention - but discussion moves us forward and there are plenty of people who could benefit from it.

Martin - I have used a photo from your site. I hope you do not mind, if you do, contact me and I'll remove it.


The article can be found just below my header above, to the right, headed "Shelters". But I have linked it here.

9 comments:

  1. The photo was sent to me by Henry Shires. Just attribute it to him. You can use any photo of mine for your blog anytime. I will read the write up with interest.

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  2. Maz,
    How does the Fly Creek stand up to strong winds blowing from the side.?
    With only the waterproofing spec. at 1200mm for both Groundsheet and Fly is this a problem? Does it need a footprint?
    I would be interested in what you think of the design and quality of manufacture.
    Thanks...Alan

    ReplyDelete
  3. Each time I have used it, I have pitched the back of the Fly Creek into the wind - this means I have a calm porch area as well as the shelter being very stable. The Fly Creek is such an easy and automatically taut pitch that I would think it would be reasonably strong in the wind. The only experience I have of strong wind was in Moelwyns when I used the Vaude Power Lizard and my friend used a Seedhouse SL1 (identical blueprint, but slightly heavier). Looking at them both, I found the Seedhouse to be less affected by the wind than Lizzie.

    As to the waterproofing spec - I do not use a footprint as I think sensitive pitching ensures the groundsheet is protected despite its UL materials. I can't comment on the hydrostatic head as I don't really pay that much attention to that aspect, I'll be honest. The MOD suggest that 800mm is "waterproof" but 1000mm is the accepted minimum for an fabric to be considered "waterproof". Most tents are 1500mm or more but 1200mm seems sufficient to me - now that I am considering it. The build quality is great. I like a taut pitch and so I pull everything very tight but I find that Lizzie causes me more concern as to quality than the Fly Creek. Stitching is great everywhere and the design has only one real flaw - the sharp slope of the porch means it's a tricky endeavour to use a stove. Have a look at my review within the pages of this blog. All in all, Big Agnes take genuine care over their products in my experience (I have two of their tents).

    ReplyDelete
  4. Quick search on the internet provides this for comparison:

    Laser Competition: Fly 3000m, groundsheet 5000m
    Hilleberg Nallo and Akto: Fly 2000m, groundsheet 5000m

    Hilleberg uses KPA rather than mm, but 1000mm = 9.8KPA.

    On that analysis, a pure scientific analysis, the Laser and Hilleberg tents will be more waterproof than the Fly Creek. I've never had any problems and, in prolonged heavy rain, the Fly Creek may suffer from misting. That said, it's 970g and there are always trade-offs. If you knew you'd be in horrible wet weather and wet ground was inevitable, you could take a footprint made of a material with a high HH rating.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Maz.
    Thanks for your thoughts, i will take note. I'm considering getting a new tent as we would like a little more room now than the Odyssee provides although i must say it has been and still is, a cracking tent.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Each time I have used it, I have pitched the back of the Fly Creek into the wind - this means I have a calm porch area as well as the shelter being very stable. The Fly Creek is such an easy and automatically taut pitch that I would think it would be reasonably strong in the wind. The only experience I have of strong wind was in Moelwyns when I used the Vaude Power Lizard and my friend used a Seedhouse SL1 (identical blueprint, but slightly heavier). Looking at them both, I found the Seedhouse to be less affected by the wind than Lizzie.

    As to the waterproofing spec - I do not use a footprint as I think sensitive pitching ensures the groundsheet is protected despite its UL materials. I can't comment on the hydrostatic head as I don't really pay that much attention to that aspect, I'll be honest. The MOD suggest that 800mm is "waterproof" but 1000mm is the accepted minimum for an fabric to be considered "waterproof". Most tents are 1500mm or more but 1200mm seems sufficient to me - now that I am considering it. The build quality is great. I like a taut pitch and so I pull everything very tight but I find that Lizzie causes me more concern as to quality than the Fly Creek. Stitching is great everywhere and the design has only one real flaw - the sharp slope of the porch means it's a tricky endeavour to use a stove. Have a look at my review within the pages of this blog. All in all, Big Agnes take genuine care over their products in my experience (I have two of their tents).

    ReplyDelete